Home » William Courtenay: Archbishop of Canterbury, 1381-1396 by Joseph H Dahmus
William Courtenay: Archbishop of Canterbury, 1381-1396 Joseph H Dahmus

William Courtenay: Archbishop of Canterbury, 1381-1396

Joseph H Dahmus

Published November 19th 1991
ISBN : 9780271731216
Hardcover
250 pages
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 About the Book 

Courtenay has long deserved a biography in his own right and because of close association with Wyclif and Lollardy. His career also reflects the fabric and practice of the late medieval church--such larger subjects as metropolitan visitations,MoreCourtenay has long deserved a biography in his own right and because of close association with Wyclif and Lollardy. His career also reflects the fabric and practice of the late medieval church--such larger subjects as metropolitan visitations, episcopal convocations, clerical corruption, and papal provisions.Few bishops exercised such great influence in public affairs--a result of Courtenays aristocratic parentage, his own aggressiveness, and the weakness of the crown. During the closing years of Edwards reign and the minority of Richard II, Courtenay was the most outspoken of the bishops and lay lords who sought to keep John of Gaunt from gaining full control of the administration. In the late 1370s, Courtenay served on the continual council which practically governed England. As archbishop, his political responsibility was to preserve church prerogatives against the autocratic ambitions of Richard.Bishop Courtenay of London, rather than the hesitant Archbishop Sudbury, directed the church in its duel with John of Gaunt over Wyclif. Although the bishop and Gaunt were bitter opponents, they eventually agreed on the manner of silencing Wyclif. As archbishop, Courtenay also initiated the churchs most ambitious effort in eradicating Lollardy.The administration of his own archdiocese is also of interest. A number of reformatory degrees aimed at several monasteries and at such general abuses as non-residence are given in translation for the first time.